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The Anatomy of Engineered Garments

Creating clothing in that grey area between casual and formal, EG accomplishes the difficult task of making things that dress up or down easily. Versatile styling and detail rich, there are few brands that can pull off what EG does with finesse.

We’re perpetually excited to see what Engineered Garments is going to release every season. There are always some new things in the mix - special pieces that stand out and make statements - but the backbone of every collection is a core of EG originals in new colors, fabrics and patterns. Each one is the gold standard for its type.

Let’s get down to the details…

engineered garments claighton jacket on body

Claighton Jacket

Fit & Drape:

Roomy silhouette and a bit boxy.


Length:

Falls to the hip. A somewhat shorter cut that is reminiscent of vintage sporting jackets.


Pocket Details:

Two inset side pockets angled for comfortable access.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Seams are placed in a relaxed, low shoulder position for easy movement.


Notes & Style Points:

Lightweight and easy pairing, the Claighton Jacket is everything you need when the wind whips up or the sun goes down. Stream-lined and simple at first glance, Engineered Garments has still managed to pack in the details without overdoing this classic driving jacket. Slash pockets at the perfect angle to rest your hands; a dual way zipper and side cinches for styling options; pointed button closure cuffs; a hidden wind strip like you’d find in a flight jacket; and a throat latch for a bit of a workwear spin - this jacket has more than meets the eye. Even with all that, the fit is the main detail here and makes it an all-around, easy go-to.


Styling Suggestions:

Perfect with jeans and a tee. Keep it simple and let the silhouette speak for itself.

engineered garments loiter jacket on body
engineered garments loiter jacket on body
engineered garments loiter jacket on body
engineered garments loiter jacket on body

Loiter Jacket

Fit & Drape:

Roomy body, but with a foundation in tailoring. Imagine a blazer and top coat mixed together.


Length:

Standard blazer length.


Pocket Details:

Two large flap pockets at the hips and a single patch pocket on the left breast.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Unstructured blazer fit with a little bit of slouch.


Notes & Style Points:

Whether you’re staying home or headed out the door, an unstructured blazer adds layers of style and function to whatever you’re doing. They have a formal heart, but with pockets to stuff and plenty of buttons to play with the shape, there are enough styling options and details to keep it relaxed. Can be buttoned all the way up to the tab collar or worn open with a classic, notch lapel. Three button cuff and side cinches to tailor the look when you want. Interior piping at the seams to make it last.


Styling Suggestions:

This is a super versatile piece. Pair it down with jeans and a sweater, or dress it up by putting on some nice trousers. Engineered Garments usually makes a matching pants option for the Loiter Jacket if you’re looking for the full suit. Most of the time, we like to keep it casual and paired down.

engineered garments bedford jacket on body
engineered garments bedford jacket on body
engineered garments bedford jacket on body

Bedford Jacket

Fit & Drape:

Semi tailored piece with an angular flow.


Length:

Standard length with no vent and straight hem.


Pocket Details:

Two large hip pockets and usually two chest pockets cut on the bias. The above version has a large pocket watch like pocket above the right hip pocket.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Relaxed.


Notes & Style Points:

This jacket is meant to be worn. Removable buttons so it’s easy to launder as often as you need. Peak lapel for a slightly more elevated look that feels traditional and romantic, but not flashy. Extra stitching across pockets, at stress points, and just for more style points. Panel construction with workwear roots, but is so much more.


Styling Suggestions:

You can do anything with this jacket. A cross between a blazer and a chore coat, the Bedford Jacket is a catchall for outerwear. Just enough tailoring to clean up a look or worn as a suit, but casual enough for wearing with a tee and shorts.

engineered garments new bedford nb jacket on body
engineered garments new bedford nb jacket on body
engineered garments new bedford nb jacket on body
engineered garments new bedford nb jacket on body

NB (New Bedford) Jacket

Fit & Drape:

Slightly roomier than its predecessor, the NB Jacket has the body of the Loiter.


Length:

A bit longer than the Bedford, this jacket fits almost like a modern chesterfield.


Pocket Details:

Two large hip pockets and two chest pockets cut on the bias.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Relaxed.


Notes & Style Points:

The NB Jacket is like the love child of the Loiter and Bedford - taking the good attributes of both. Angled four pocket setup and the peaked lapel are taken right off the Bedford, drape and cut is from the Loiter, but it’s a bit longer than either parent.


Styling Suggestions:

Same as the Bedford Jacket. The NB plays nicely with everything. It has a bit less of the workwear chore coat influence and more of the formal heart of a traditional blazer than the earlier model without losing its ability to pair it however you want.

engineered garments over parka on body
engineered garments over parka on body
engineered garments over parka on body
engineered garments over parka on body
engineered garments over parka on body
engineered garments over parka on body

Over Parka

Fit & Drape:

Big and spacious, expanding from the shoulders down.


Length:

Falls just past the pocket line with a pretty traditional parka length.


Pocket Details:

Large button closure pocket set up higher like on many anoraks. It is a very large and unique pocket with hand warmers, but is also a full service pocket that doesn’t get interrupted when your hands are taking a break. The more the merrier in that thing. Two lower side pockets have zip closures to secure some treasures.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Standard across the shoulders. Elastic band and button wrist to batten down the hatches over gloves.


Notes & Style Points:

The Over Parka is clearly military inspired with big resin buttons at the hood, a wind flap that locks in the hood drawstring, a short brim worked onto the cowl and a whole lot of utilitarian purpose. Pulling some additional details out of the Inuit-inspired anorak jacket gives it a little extra adventuring intent. Full zip in the back for allowing different levels of air flow and drawstring cinch bottom hem makes it ready to take on howling winds. But even with all those details, it maintains a clean look with a bit of fashion to the cut.


Styling Suggestions:

Toss this over your entire look. No matter how many layers you’re already wearing, this is the last one you’ll need for functionality and warmth. Works best with a military inspired fit.

engineered garments andover pants on body
engineered garments andover pants on body
engineered garments andover pants on body
engineered garments andover pants on body

Andover Pant

Top Block & Hip Placement:

High rise for comfort and easy tucking.


Taper:

The taper gets more aggressive from the knee down, but the high rise doesn’t give this an overly slim appearance or feel.


Length:

Slightly cropped and ends right at the ankle for most.


Pocket Details:

Slash pockets with inset rear pockets. Very traditional trouser trimmings.


Notes & Style Points:

Zip fly and tacked cuff at the hem. Modest V-shaped yoke at waist to keep ‘em up and with a split seam at the back to make your tuck game easy. Two pleats pull it together just a little more and keep to its casual tailoring nature.


Styling Suggestions:

Because the silhouette is so comfortable and not too formal, you can easily dress this down, but EG likes to style these with their matching Bedford Jacket and make it a suit. A very versatile pant all-around.

engineered garments fatigue pants on body

Fatigue Pant

Top Block & Hip Placement:

The same high rise you’d find in a vintage pair.


Taper:

Very light taper that wears pretty closely to a straight leg.


Length:

Standard length with a clever twist. These pants have two holes in the hem to allow for running a string to cinch them up.


Pocket Details:

Two fatigue style patch pockets on the front and two large button closure flap pockets on the back. Some seasons, EG also includes a small zip closure stash pocket on the front left pocket.


Notes & Style Points:

These are hard-wearing classics with just a few extras to make them stand out. The fabrics for these are always either reverse cotton sateen or cotton ripstop. Sateen offers a smooth finish with a clean drape. Ripstop is extremely tough, stops tears from spreading and softens with wear.


Styling Suggestions:

Wears nice and loose with a white tee and pairs perfect to a blue chambray work shirt.

engineered garments work shirt on body
engineered garments work shirt on body
engineered garments work shirt on body

Work Shirt

Fit & Drape:

Traditional, boxier workwear fit. Comfortable cut for easy movement that works almost like a shirt jacket.


Length:

Runs a bit longer like traditional shirting with a rounded hem that rises up to side gussets. These gussets were originally introduced (many decades ago) to keep this style of shirt  tucked in while still allowing a lot of movement throughout the workday without needing to fuss it back down.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Relaxed arm and shoulder with a reinforced elbow and large barrel cuff.


Pocket Details:

The cigarette pocket that first appeared in the 1930 is dug out of the historical dustbin and sits on the left chest for right-handed easy access. It’s an expanding pocket with extra folds of fabric to open like an accordion with a peaked button closure so you can pull a cig out without dropping the pack when you bend over. The other chest pocket is a large notepad pocket with a pencil slot; notably longer than what you’d typically see today, it was made for the traditional construction logbooks that were popular in the 40s.


Notes & Style Points:

There’s a lot of pre-industrial shirting design incorporated into EG’s Work Shirt. The design may look a little askew today, but wasn’t uncommon in the first half of the 20th century. In many seasons, EG uses an odd colored final button on the placket to denote the season it is from.


Styling Suggestions:

Wear it as a shirt or jacket. Either way, get back to work in it.

engineered garments camp shirt on body
engineered garments camp shirt on body

Camp Shirt

Fit & Drape:

Traditional lawn shirt style with a boxy fit. Nice and airy for the summer months.


Length:

Standard length with a straight hem and short side slits.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

A relaxed short sleeve with a generous sewn cuff that falls to mid-bicep on most.


Pocket Details:

Single chest pocket. Sometimes EG includes an additional pocket on the opposite panel by the hip to add some functionality when the weather is warm and you don’t want to be weighed down with an extra bag.


Notes & Style Points:

A summer button down with a very relaxed look. This is the mainland interpretation of the hawaiian Aloha shirt. Spread collar with button loop. Top button is more aesthetic than anything, the Camp Shirt is meant to be worn open at the neck.


Styling Suggestions:

Wear with shorts or relaxed pants, this shirt is meant to be paired with anything that feels comfortable. Something breezy and not too tight works best.

engineered garments short collar shirt on body
engineered garments short collar shirt on body
engineered garments short collar shirt on body

Short Collar Shirt

Fit & Drape:

Tailored like a dress shirt.


Length:

Standard dress shirt length with a curved hem.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Comfortable without any slouch.


Pocket Details:

Classic single pocket on the left breast.


Notes & Style Points:

A couple of twists on this otherwise straight-forward dress shirt. A hidden placket covers the buttons for super clean lines like you’d most often see in tuxedo formal wear, but then strikes a balance with EG’s use of color and pattern. The short collar is also a chic, vintage style point.


Styling Suggestions:

Under a jacket and buttoned to the top with no tie.

engineered garments 19th century bd shirt on body
engineered garments 19th century bd shirt on body
engineered garments 19th century bd shirt on body
engineered garments 19th century bd shirt on body

19th Century BD Shirt

Fit & Drape:

Longer fit with a big scoop on the hem that tucks in nicely. Slightly longer tail than the front.


Length:

Long body that ends at the bottom of the hip.


Arm & Shoulder Fit:

Standard on both.


Pocket Details:

Usually features a classic single pocket on the left breast, but there are variations on this one like the above.


Notes & Style Points:

A longer collar than EG’s other offerings - harkening to 60s Ivy Style. Collar buttons down like classic formal shirting. The placket stops before it hits the hem and allows it to drape interestingly. Bunched at the shoulder hem and spine to keep the shape flowing.


Styling Suggestions:

Engineered Garments is all about reverse layering. Wearing this under a shorter jacket and allowing it to blouse out is really how this is meant to be worn, and adds both a non-traditional layering pattern and an interesting silhouette that feels advanced.


This is the EG gear that comes back every season. All of it mixes in elements that keeps each item compelling. 

What's your core favorite from Engineered Garments? #Tag us wearing yours on Instagram and let us know. 

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